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  • #31
    These two data sets represent our most recent set of alignments and the frozen alignments used for the phase1 analysis effort

    There will be overlapping individuals between the two sets but no bam files should be the same as an extended version of GRCh37 is being used for the post phase1 mapping

    see http://www.1000genomes.org/faq/which...bly-do-you-use

    You should be able to tell the difference between these files by the YYYYMMDD in their name as this points to the sequence index they were based on

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    • #32
      @papori I had the same issue. You can download the "sequence.index" file from the ftp site (ftp://ftp.1000genomes.ebi.ac.uk/vol1/ftp/). In Excel, I ended up making a new column where I divided BASE_COUNT by READ_COUNT. You can then filter the read length you are looking for.

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      • #33
        Please is there any one can help me how can I BLAST one FASTE file with more than 3000 sequences

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        • #34
          Mokhtar you would be better creating a new thread for your question, this isnt really related to the 1000 genomes project

          If you let people know what your sequences (dna, cdna, protein?) are and what species you are working in they will probably be able to offer better advice

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          • #35
            Please is there any one can help me how can I BLAST one FASTE file with more than 3000 DNA sequences generated from fungus community.

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            • #36
              Start a new thread, this is not the right place for this question

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