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Is there a clear definition of 3rd generation sequencing?

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  • mucku
    replied
    Originally posted by GenoMax View Post
    Time to let go of the "generation" part?
    I guess you are right... the generation length has probably become too short anyways with all the new sequencing methods popping up... let's just call it post-Sanger sequencing...

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  • GenoMax
    replied
    Time to let go of the "generation" part?

    But if one must: Think of what is *not* currently "shipping/generally available" as simply the "next-gen".

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  • nickloman
    replied
    I think "we'll know it when we see it". Don't think it's about light / not-light.

    I think true 3rd gen would be: single molecule, massive throughput, low cost.

    PacBio is nearly there.

    But probably not the others. Ion Torrent is 2.5G, I think.

    Everyone expects Nanopore to be "true 3G" when it releases.

    Just my 2p!

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  • Is there a clear definition of 3rd generation sequencing?

    Hi,

    I have a question...
    Is there a real definition of what 3rd generation sequencing is?
    Or is it just depending on which company you ask? Some say single molecule sequencing is 3rd gen, some say 3rd gen is when you don't need light anymore for detection...

    So you can put IonTorrent, Nanopores into third when going for non-light and PacBio, Helicos into 2nd gen.
    Or you use the single molecule argument and kick back IonTorrent into 2nd put Helicos, Nanopores and PacBio into 3rd...
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