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  • Hi SEQanswers!

    Hi all,

    I'm a new user round these parts. PhD student in ecological genomics and evolutionary bioinformatics (or something like that) with not a great deal of local sources of information - I'm a biologist working in a geography department! I'll be asking questions about sequencing and assembling genomes from environmental samples and will be happy to share my successes/failures with any interested parties. Also my first time actually joining a forum rather than resorting good 'ol Google so please be gentle.

    Cheers

    Nathan

  • #2
    I've been amazed at how much NGS is going on these days in geography departments. Lots of tree/landscape genomics work there and researchers are seizing on sequencing as a useful tool.
    Providing nextRAD genotyping and PacBio sequencing services. http://snpsaurus.com

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    • #3
      Right, NGS is certainly turning out to be pretty powerful in understanding spatial distributions of genes/organisms ona large scale. Unfortunately not so much infrastructure in Geography departments that maybe biologists have become accustomed to. I think our molecular biology lab is a repurposed analytical chemistry laband keeping it 'clean' for molecular work is proving problematic!

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