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  • dkrtndhkd
    replied
    yes, i read the article you linked.

    as i understood,

    Originally posted by rhinoceros View Post
    These results demonstrate that inverted-V apexes contain ORIs, as predicted, and suggest that this genome-wide association can be used to functionally validate our data set of putative ORIs.
    from this, they validated the newly found ORIs.

    Originally posted by rhinoceros View Post
    Finally, we investigated whether the newly identified ORIs were also selected in other cell types, in particular, in cells of non-cancer origin. To address this question, we performed anti-ORC1 Q-ChIP of low-density chromatin fractions from activated CD4+ T cells purified from the peripheral blood of a healthy donor. In these cells, we observed ORC1 binding in six out of seven ORIs identified in HeLa cells (Fig. 3D), thus suggesting that the same ORIs can be activated both in normal and cancer-derived (HeLa) cells.
    and from this, they found that the position of ORIs in HeLa cells are similar with those of CD4+ T cells.

    so i understood that there exists possible set of ORIs information accessible for researchers.

    am i wrong?

    Leave a comment:


  • rhinoceros
    replied
    Originally posted by dkrtndhkd View Post
    oh, i'm confused the term, replication fork and origin of replication.

    i'm sorry... thank you i learned a new concept.

    then, question again; the position of the origin of replication is fixed? then how can i get the information?
    Didn't read the article I linked?

    In metazoa, instead, pre-RC does not exhibit sequence specificity, and the number of potential ORIs is considerably larger, following a process of selection that differs according to cell type, functional status, or stress conditions (Mechali 2010). These further levels of complexity allow DNA replication to adapt to the unique expression patterns of individual cell types. Little is known, however, about the regulation of ORI selection and replication timing in metazoa.

    Leave a comment:


  • dkrtndhkd
    replied
    oh, i'm confused the term, replication fork and origin of replication.

    i'm sorry... thank you i learned a new concept.

    then, question again; the position of the origin of replication is fixed? then how can i get the information?

    Leave a comment:


  • dkrtndhkd
    replied
    Oh, it's interesting...

    until now, I knew that replication fork site(ORC1 binding site) is fixed.

    thank you for your reply!

    Leave a comment:


  • rhinoceros
    replied
    Well, its position obviously changes as it moves along the DNA

    Now, if you were interested in loci of ORC1 binding sites, this could be helpful..

    Leave a comment:


  • dkrtndhkd
    replied
    Originally posted by rhinoceros View Post
    In every sequenced organism?
    no, in homo sapiens!

    Leave a comment:


  • rhinoceros
    replied
    In every sequenced organism?

    Leave a comment:


  • dkrtndhkd
    started a topic How can i get replication fork's position?

    How can i get replication fork's position?

    I want to know the position of replication fork of each chromosome.

    ex)chr 1:bp10000, bp120000...
    chr 2:bp 11000, bp 100000...

    I searched about it from NCBI, UCSC but I could not get it.

    Is there anybody who knows it?

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