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  • Fragment Analyzer-Advanced Analytical

    Hi, does anyone know how the Fragment Analyzer from Advanced Analytical perform compared to the Agilent Bioanalyzer and Tapestation? I am interested in the quality, reliability, and cost comparison. I saw some threads in the past on this subject, but wonder if anyone has any updated info on this instrument?

    Thanks so much!

  • #2
    Hi,

    Fragment analyzer is a very powerfull machine. We use it routinely because our is a 96 capillary system, and we can put 3 or 4 plates in a same time.
    We have also bioanalyzer to perform DNA 1000 or HS chip but it is only for 12 or 11 samples.
    Fragment analyzer is cheaper than bioanalyzer if you have plenty of samples

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    • #3
      Hello-

      We did a head to head comparison of the Fragment analyzer and the Bioanalyzer for RNA QC. In terms of sensitivity, the Bioanalyzer was more sensitive in detecting low input total RNA (50-100 pg/uL). Cost/sample is lower for the Fragment analyzer and it certainly has a lot of things going for it if you are just using final QC of NGS libs. Depending on which capillary head you get on it (12,48, or 96), you can get a couple of Bioanalyzers for the same cost. I recommend you demo it to see how it fits your needs. Really depends on your throughput needs.

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      • #4
        How long can the reagents sit in the machine between runs?

        I'm interested in suggesting my group buy a FA. We already have a Bioanalyzer 2100 but the kits are expensive and the gel only is good for about 30 days after adding the dye. We don't use it that often I'd want to reduce the high cost and waste associated with the BA.

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        • #5
          To answer my own question I emailed their tech support and got the following in their reply:

          Once you have opened a bottle of Separation Gel, it will still be good until the expiration date as long you continue to store the bottle at 4 degrees Celsius as recommended. Once intercalating dye is added to an aliquot of gel, that aliquot of gel can be left in the instrument for up to 2 weeks. If you use the instrument infrequently, then you can also prepare a single run aliquot of gel to maximize your cost efficiency.

          The Fragment Analyzer is much less expensive to run than the BioAnalyzer. Our Quantitative kits which can size and provide absolute quantification of DNA and RNA samples cost between $2.40-$2.50 per sample. If you are simply looking to determine the size profile of a DNA sample, you can use our qualitative kits which cost $0.68-$0.75 per sample.
          ...
          DNA Analysis kits have a shelf life of 1 year. RNA Analysis kits have a shelf life of 6 months.
          Reagent stability is definitely much better than the BA. Of course, for the costs, it all depends on what you are charged for the reagents. For the BA, I'm estimating most people in academia will be paying about $4 per sample (assuming all wells used per chip). Even if the stated FA prices are overly generous it's still cheaper than the BA. On the other hand, the cost of the machine is much higher.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NathalieA View Post
            Hi,

            Fragment analyzer is a very powerfull machine. We use it routinely because our is a 96 capillary system, and we can put 3 or 4 plates in a same time.
            We have also bioanalyzer to perform DNA 1000 or HS chip but it is only for 12 or 11 samples.
            Fragment analyzer is cheaper than bioanalyzer if you have plenty of samples
            Hello I'm wondering if the 12-capillary and 96-capillary systems are different or can I switch from 12 to 96 with the same machine.
            thanks
            diego

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