Seqanswers Leaderboard Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • GenoMax
    replied
    @Kapara sometimes reality does not follow what is written in the paper. Journals don't always enforce these claim submissions so it would be best to email the authors and confirm.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marc_Jones
    replied
    I would email all four authors...they do all have emails on the Article as sort of corresponding authors.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kapara newbie
    replied
    Hey GenoMax, thanks!

    At the end of the article, in Data availability, it's said:
    The Antarctic blackfin icefish C. aceratus genome and transcriptome data have been deposited in the NCBI database as BioProject PRJNA420419.
    Was I wrong to understand from that that the assembled genome was deposited as well?

    Regards asking for the assembly in the mail.
    Is it ok to send a letter to all four supplied addresses at once? Or would it be better to try getting their help one after the other?

    Leave a comment:


  • GenoMax
    replied
    People may not always submit the corresponding assemblies to NCBI. You could email the authors and ask.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kapara newbie
    started a topic Finding a genome assembly in BioProject

    Finding a genome assembly in BioProject

    Hey all, fresh MSc. student and user here.

    I'm looking for the genome assembly of Chaenocephalus aceratus (Antarctic blackfin icefish) which should be found in BioProject PRJNA420419, as reported by the writers of this article.

    However, as far as I understand, the BioProject data only links to 14 SRA Experiments in 13 BioSamples.
    There is a link to genome information of that organism in a green tile at the right side of the page. However, it links to another BioProject with different accession number (PRJEB12469 instead of PRJNA420419).

    Am I missing something or is it the assembly that is missing?

    Thanks ahead.

Latest Articles

Collapse

  • seqadmin
    Current Approaches to Protein Sequencing
    by seqadmin


    Proteins are often described as the workhorses of the cell, and identifying their sequences is key to understanding their role in biological processes and disease. Currently, the most common technique used to determine protein sequences is mass spectrometry. While still a valuable tool, mass spectrometry faces several limitations and requires a highly experienced scientist familiar with the equipment to operate it. Additionally, other proteomic methods, like affinity assays, are constrained...
    04-04-2024, 04:25 PM
  • seqadmin
    Strategies for Sequencing Challenging Samples
    by seqadmin


    Despite advancements in sequencing platforms and related sample preparation technologies, certain sample types continue to present significant challenges that can compromise sequencing results. Pedro Echave, Senior Manager of the Global Business Segment at Revvity, explained that the success of a sequencing experiment ultimately depends on the amount and integrity of the nucleic acid template (RNA or DNA) obtained from a sample. “The better the quality of the nucleic acid isolated...
    03-22-2024, 06:39 AM

ad_right_rmr

Collapse

News

Collapse

Topics Statistics Last Post
Started by seqadmin, 04-11-2024, 12:08 PM
0 responses
30 views
0 likes
Last Post seqadmin  
Started by seqadmin, 04-10-2024, 10:19 PM
0 responses
32 views
0 likes
Last Post seqadmin  
Started by seqadmin, 04-10-2024, 09:21 AM
0 responses
28 views
0 likes
Last Post seqadmin  
Started by seqadmin, 04-04-2024, 09:00 AM
0 responses
53 views
0 likes
Last Post seqadmin  
Working...
X