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SeqMonk: Visualisation and analysis for large mapped data sets

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  • SeqMonk: Visualisation and analysis for large mapped data sets

    [Sorry to open a new thread, but as there were a few previous SeqMonk threads I thought I'd open a new one and put everything in here from now on]

    SeqMonk is a desktop application which is able to view and analyse large mapped data sets. It is a cross platform program which runs on normal PC hardware, and is designed with the needs of the bench scientist in mind.

    It requires no computing infrastructure (back end databases etc), and virtually no configuration before you can start analysing your data.

    I've just put out the latest release of the program (v0.13.0), which includes some significant additions to the program:
    • You can now import data from BAM files, and SAM import is much quicker than before
    • You can export quantitated data as BEDGraph files
    • A line graph tool to visualise quantitation changes between samples
    • A set of clustering tools to automatically or manually find sets of probes with correlated quantitation profiles
    • A new per-probe normalisation method


    I've also created a series of tutorial videos on our youtube channel which show how to get started with SeqMonk, and also go through some example analyses of ChIP-Seq or RNA-Seq data. More of these will be coming in the next few weeks.

    You can get more information on SeqMonk from:

    http://www.bioinformatics.bbsrc.ac.uk/projects/seqmonk/

    I'll post future updates in this thread, but you can also be notified about any of our software packages by following our twitter stream.

  • #2
    Hi Simon
    I'd be pleased to test seqmonk but I didn't find among downloadable genomes rice (Oryza sativa) on which I'm working right now.
    any option to see rice and other plant genomes (apart from arabidospis) downloadable ? or is there any way to provide seqmonk with more genomes than currently available/downloadable ?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by pbseq View Post
      Hi Simon
      I'd be pleased to test seqmonk but I didn't find among downloadable genomes rice (Oryza sativa) on which I'm working right now.
      any option to see rice and other plant genomes (apart from arabidospis) downloadable ? or is there any way to provide seqmonk with more genomes than currently available/downloadable ?
      Our genome data is derived from Ensembl so we only easily support genomes which they have on their system. We recently expanded our coverage to the EnsemblGenomes site from the main site (to add in bacteria and plants). I'm just in the process of including TAIR10 for Arabidopsis, but will put Rice as the next genome in the queue after that. It should be on the servers early next week.

      You can also make up your own custom genomes to use with the program. The annotations are read from EMBL format feature files with some minor modifications. Details of how to do this are in:

      http://www.bioinformatics.bbsrc.ac.u...OM_GENOMES.txt

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by pbseq View Post
        I'd be pleased to test seqmonk but I didn't find among downloadable genomes rice (Oryza sativa) on which I'm working right now.
        I've just added the rice genome to our servers so you should be able to import it now.

        If it doesn't show up in the genome list when you go to import it then use a browser to go to:

        http://www.bioinformatics.bbsrc.ac.u...nome_index.txt

        ..and press shift+refresh in your browser to clear you cache, and then try again.

        Comment


        • #5
          Simon,
          many thanks, I'll give a try soon

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi, Simon:

            I just downloaded seqMonk and tried to run it on my PC but got such a error message:


            C:\Documents and Settings>java -Xms128m -Xmx1500m -Dsun.java2d.opengl=fals
            e -classpath .;./sam-1.32.jar uk.ac.bbsrc.babraham.SeqMonk.SeqMonkApplication
            Error occurred during initialization of VM
            Could not reserve enough space for object heap
            Could not create the Java virtual machine.

            C:\Documents and Settings


            Is there anything I should set up before running seqMonk?

            Thanks in advance!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by seqcode View Post
              Hi, Simon:

              I just downloaded seqMonk and tried to run it on my PC but got such a error message:

              Could not reserve enough space for object heap
              The default configuration for 32 bit seqmonk assumes that you have 2GB of RAM available. If you have less than this (which it appears you do), then you'll need to lower the amount of RAM SeqMonk can access. This will limit the amount of data you can analyse, but may be OK depending on the size of dataset you're working with.

              Details of how to change the memory setup from the default are in the README.txt file.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks a lot, Simon. It worked after I changed the allowed memory to 1400m. I only have 3 GB memory on my computer, I guess the memory available to this program (with several other applications running too) is just under the default requirement.

                I am quite new to this field and am just familiaring myself with seqMonk. I am planning to run some experiment to look at global DNA methylation profile in certain animal disease model with a meDIP-seq approach. From what I understand so far, seqMonk should be suited to analyze this data, am I right?

                Thanks again.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by seqcode View Post
                  Thanks a lot, Simon. It worked after I changed the allowed memory to 1400m. I only have 3 GB memory on my computer, I guess the memory available to this program (with several other applications running too) is just under the default requirement.
                  For it to fail under those circumstances you must have run out of real and virtual memory. It might be worth checking how much virtual memory you have enabled (if any), as you should be able to run the default SeqMonk configuration with that hardware.

                  Originally posted by seqcode View Post
                  I am quite new to this field and am just familiaring myself with seqMonk. I am planning to run some experiment to look at global DNA methylation profile in certain animal disease model with a meDIP-seq approach. From what I understand so far, seqMonk should be suited to analyze this data, am I right?
                  Yes, we probably do more MeDIP analysis than any other kind of experiment, so hopefully SeqMonk should provide a useful set of tools for analysing this kind of data.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    support for poorly annotated genomes

                    Hi Simon

                    I do not have a EMBL style genome sequence. I only have the genome sequence file (fasta) and GTF file. Is there some tool to convert them into a format that SeqMonk can use?

                    Cheers
                    sz

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      support for poorly annotated genomes

                      Hi Simon

                      I do not have a EMBL style genome sequence. I only have the genome sequence file (fasta) and GTF file. Is there some tool to convert them into a format that SeqMonk can use?

                      Cheers
                      sz

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by silin284 View Post
                        I do not have a EMBL style genome sequence. I only have the genome sequence file (fasta) and GTF file. Is there some tool to convert them into a format that SeqMonk can use?
                        If you're working on a genome which is present in Ensembl (any of the subsections) then just let me know which one it is and I'll add it to the official repository.

                        If you want to process it yourself then you can adapt the BioPerl script we use for making the main repositories. The script is in the 'Scripts' directory at the top level of the SeqMonk installation. You can use the basic structure but just rip out the EnsemblAPI stuff. The basic idea is:
                        • Create a sequence object representing a chromosome
                        • Read in a list of features for that chromosome (from the GTF file in your case)
                        • Write the object out as an EMBL file
                        • Remove the sequence part to save on space (optional)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks again, Simon. Would you please point me to a few recent publications out of your recent MeDIP work so I can learn the methods in more detail?



                          Yes, we probably do more MeDIP analysis than any other kind of experiment, so hopefully SeqMonk should provide a useful set of tools for analysing this kind of data.[/QUOTE]

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by seqcode View Post
                            Thanks again, Simon. Would you please point me to a few recent publications out of your recent MeDIP work so I can learn the methods in more detail?
                            Maybe in a few weeks, assuming our response to reviewers goes well

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Look forward to that. Best of luck!

                              Originally posted by simonandrews View Post
                              Maybe in a few weeks, assuming our response to reviewers goes well

                              Comment

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