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  • Complete Genomics launches Sequencing by Hybridization service

    Complete Genomics just launched a new service model for sequencing using Rade Drmanac's Sequence by Hybridization/DNA ligation technology. The company says it's already sequenced a genome for $4000 (its cost of materials) and will get that down to $1000 by next spring (2009) -- charging customers $5000.

    Detailed story/interview at Bio-IT World:
    http://www.bio-itworld.com/headlines...ar-genome.html

    (There's a second story more on the technology and IT posted also.)
    Kevin Davies
    Author, The $1,000 Genome

  • #2
    Stunning

    I think this is what Church was talking about 2 weeks ago! (link).

    By 2010, Complete Genomics intends to have more than 50% of the worldwide human DNA sequencing capacity (link).1000 genomes in 2009, 20,000 genomes by 2010

    Here is a PDF file of Complete Genomics Technology Whitepaper

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    • #3
      Complete Genomics

      Thanks for the PDF!
      1 million genomes in the next 5 years spread across 10 genome centers in the US and abroad. Talk about shaking up the next-generation sequencing market!
      Kevin Davies
      Author, The $1,000 Genome

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      • #4
        they win the prize for promises.

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        • #5
          Four sequential circularization reactons??

          Comment


          • #6
            Does anyone have any more information on their reads? From what I could make out it was something like a series of 10bp reads, 2 of which are adjacent giving a 20bp read and another which is within some distance of the others. Perhaps someone here can glean more information than me from the website?

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            • #7
              Complete Genomics reads

              As I understand it, the 70-80 bases of genomic DNA in each nanoball are separated by four adapters every 20 bases or so. Each adapter allows the reading of up to 10 bases of genomic DNA.
              The complete (hah!) white paper is here:
              http://www.completegenomicsinc.com/c...y/default.aspx
              Kevin Davies
              Author, The $1,000 Genome

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by natgenex View Post
                As I understand it, the 70-80 bases of genomic DNA in each nanoball are separated by four adapters every 20 bases or so. Each adapter allows the reading of up to 10 bases of genomic DNA.
                The complete (hah!) white paper is here:
                http://www.completegenomicsinc.com/c...y/default.aspx
                ok, and they say:

                "two of the four adaptors are inserted into contiguous genomic DNA, so that the 10 base reads from each end of these adaptors result in 20 contiguous bases."

                then they say:

                "Four adaptors support 70 base reads (35 bases per paired‐end)"

                I'm confused... 4*10 != 35.

                Figures 11 and 12 suggest the reads are gapped so you maybe get a run of 20 bases a gap of an unknown number of bases and then another run of 10, another gap etc... still not clear where the 35bp number comes from and where the gaps are.

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                • #9
                  My sense is the protocol "could" do 80 bp (2 x 40 paired ends) if pushed, but they opt for 2 x 35 instead.
                  Maybe they just read 9 contiguous bases beyond each adapter rather than 10?
                  Kevin Davies
                  Author, The $1,000 Genome

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                  • #10
                    Complete Genomics read structure

                    Hi,

                    The read structure of our technology is two times 5+10+10+10 = 2 x 35 = 70 bp. Due to the library construction, we only read 5 bases from one of the adapters, since there are only 12-14 nucleotides between the Ad1 and Ad2 adapters. We actually read some bases twice, once from each side, hence our notation of negative gaps. So technically, we have two times [32-34 bp] = [64-68] unique reads for a sequence.

                    NOTE: Watch this space after the AGBT conference...You will be hearing a lot from us very soon!

                    Thon
                    Complete Genomics, Inc.
                    Thon
                    __________________________________
                    Thon de Boer, Ph.D.
                    Director of Product Management, Software
                    Strand Life Sciences
                    548 Market Street, Suite 82804
                    San Francisco, CA 94104, USA
                    [email protected]
                    www.strandls.com
                    Pioneers in Discovery Research Informatics
                    _______________________________________

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