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Pacific Bio releases some details on SMRT Sequencer read lengths, library prep

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  • Pacific Bio releases some details on SMRT Sequencer read lengths, library prep

    Our friends over at In Sequence posted a very interesting article containing details from Pacific Biosciences regarding their much anticipated third-gen uber-sequencer.

    I certainly don't want to steal their scoop so I won't go into detail here...I encourage you to visit their site as it's the first detailed look at what PB may offer as soon as 2010.

    Some points include long (Sanger-sized) or short reads, and five minute run times!

    UPDATED: In Sequence open access article here and above. Thanks to the editors at In Sequence for creating the open access link and for permission to repost.

  • #2
    In sequence subscription is the issue
    --
    bioinfosm

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    • #3
      I know. I'm not sure I feel right about posting info that is their site's core value.

      Plus they are very nice people. Perhaps I'll write a summary later today.

      EDIT: Just updated the first post with an open-access link to the article. Thanks to the editors of In Sequence for creating the link and permission to post.

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      • #4
        good job Eco!

        Other articles possible as well *greedy me*
        --
        bioinfosm

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        • #5
          I spent half the morning running around trying to find someone with a subscription... Thanks to In Sequence for allowing this article to be released as open access, and thanks for posting the link, ECO!
          The more you know, the more you know you don't know. —Aristotle

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          • #6
            Originally posted by bioinfosm View Post
            good job Eco!

            Other articles possible as well *greedy me*
            Originally posted by apfejes View Post
            I spent half the morning running around trying to find someone with a subscription... Thanks to In Sequence for allowing this article to be released as open access, and thanks for posting the link, ECO!
            Believe it or not, In Sequence is open access to education users. The editor told me the process is currently a bit clunky and they are working on that, but it's definitely possible now.

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            • #7
              Heh... I guess I should have spent more time trying to navigate their site than to find someone who already had access. Old habits die hard, I suppose.

              One more publication to add to the reading list, then!
              The more you know, the more you know you don't know. —Aristotle

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